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The Beatles: A Thousand Years Later

October 18, 2010

Yesterday evening, at our second Inquirer’s Class of this new program year, we discussed the history of the first Jesus followers who lived during the first two hundred years after Jesus life, death and resurrection. And as such, we explored in vivid detail just how hard it is to know much to any degree of certainty about precisely what Jesus and the early apostles, particularly Paul and Peter, were up to. Sure, we have Paul’s letters and Peter’s letters and the four Gospels. But as historical documents, these texts are very unreliable–we cannot even be sure of who wrote them, where they wrote them, when they wrote them and to what audience they wrote them. And when we examine them closely, we find many contradictions between them.

Ultimately, I think we must view the history of those early Jesus followers and the texts they wrote and compiled (which we now call The New Testament) as an old record of an old struggle (a struggle in which we all continue to engage in) regarding who and what God is and what God calls us to do. And the lack of certainty with which we must engage in this struggle of faith reminded me of the video below–a funny and clever commentary upon human ignorance. Watch it to see lots of know-it-all historians and scholars from twelve-hundred years in the future pontificate about that ancient rock band, “The Beatles”:  “First hand records are certainly scarce–there’s a lot that we don’t know about The Beatles, but we do know that these four young men, John Lennon, Paul McKenzie, Greg Huchinson, and Scottie Pippen were some of the finest musicians that ever existed.”

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